May 12, 2017 - 5:00pm
SU students from across the country represent the United States' divided perceptions of climate change.

For Eric King, learning about climate change for the first time was a confusing experience. His eighth grade science class in Columbus, Ohio, was taught two different theories: First, that the changes in weather patterns were part of the natural rhythms of the Earth and not connected to human actions, and second, that climate change was a consequence of greenhouse gas emissions and other human activities. 

 “At the end people walked out saying ‘well no one really knows what’s going on,’” the magazine journalism senior said.

May 10, 2017 - 2:39pm
The statistical decline in minority students at Syracuse University over the past two years could be representative of a larger diversity issue.

Syracuse University is home to more than 20,000 students with varying ethnic and religious backgrounds.

However, the university has seen a steady decline in diversity (by measure of statistics) over the past two years. Every ethnic background large enough to be recognized by the school, other than caucasians and international students, has decreased in population.

May 9, 2017 - 1:57pm
Activism among college students is the highest it has been in more than 50 years, according to a 2015 report – and Syracuse University is no exception.

Bea Gonzalez can recall the scene vividly: the protests, the marches, the signs, the chants – all of it.

May 8, 2017 - 3:34pm
Students interested in emerging technologies are creating original content for Syracuse and beyond.

Scattered around table are artifacts from the future-turned-present – Google cardboards, virtual reality headsets, and a round 360-degree camera. The drones to the left look like flying robotic spiders and a shiny black contraption in the next corner involves more sensors and gear than any non-engineering club might even consider possible. One student puts on a headset that completely obscures his natural vision, but takes him into another world instead.

April 30, 2017 - 2:33pm
Review: Headliner Cheat Codes, opener Moxie Raia and last-minute act Tunji Ige made Mayfest 2017 one for the books.

It started with a concerned skepticism:

"There's no way he missed his flight that's just a rumor."

Then some worried, misguided ramblings:

"How did University Union f— this up again?"

Then, finally, the confused, manic outrage:

"What are we gonna do? How will they save Mayfest? I'm coming down!"

April 28, 2017 - 4:58pm
“The goal of this paper was to shine light on the events that took place in this city,” said Zachary Lucas, the executive director of the Syrian Accountability Project.

The Syrian Accountability Project, a student-run organization composed of Syracuse University College of Law students, released its paper titled, “Covered in Dust, Veiled by Shadow: The Siege and Destruction of Aleppo” Thursday morning in the Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium.

April 25, 2017 - 8:22am
Activist Mirabelle Jones also gave the keynote speech to 15 people in HBC Gifford Auditorium Monday night.

Syracuse University’s Office of Health Promotion hosted its biggest night of Sexual Assault Awareness Month with a keynote speaker and candlelight vigil, helping end a month’s worth of educational programming.

Some 15 people gathered in the HBC Gifford Auditorium on Monday night to listen to Mirabelle Jones share her story and artwork. The crowd then moved outside for the 5th annual SU Rising Candlelight Vigil.

April 22, 2017 - 1:12pm
Not even a fire alarm in the Manley Field House could deter participants from raising money for cancer research.

The air in Manley Field House was buzzing with eagerness. Not for a Syracuse basketball game like it did over 35 years ago. This eagerness was to begin walking.

April 9, 2017 - 11:32am
The former “Teen Wolf” star addressed Hollywood’s reluctance to cast Asian and Asian-American actors Saturday afternoon.

Growing up in Amarillo, Texas, Arden Cho often faced discrimination from her classmates and even her teachers. The bullying was so severe that she ended up in the hospital on multiple occasions after being beaten up, Cho said.

“Before I went to college, I used to think that being Asian-American was the worst thing that could have happened to me,” she said.

April 5, 2017 - 11:03pm
Nazario also talks about her tumultuous journey behind her Pulitzer Prize winning work.

Sonia Nazario’s desire to be a journalist started when other journalists’ lives ended.

After her father died, her family moved from Kansas to Argentina during the country’s Dirty War, when the Argentine military dictatorship tortured and killed tens of thousands of suspected dissindents. One day, a young Nazario came across a pool of blood on the sidewalk. She learned that two journalists were killed for writing about what was going on in their country.