University Lecture

October 3, 2017 - 11:00pm
In Syracuse University's second installment of University Lectures this fall semester, David Greene lectured and answered questions about the profession of journalism in an increasingly volatile and digital landscape.

NPR "Morning Edition" and "Up First" podcast host David Greene spoke in Hendricks Chapel Tuesday night on topics ranging from his proudest moments in journalism to the lack of sleep he gets to fake news.

April 5, 2017 - 11:03pm
Nazario also talks about her tumultuous journey behind her Pulitzer Prize winning work.

Sonia Nazario’s desire to be a journalist started when other journalists’ lives ended.

After her father died, her family moved from Kansas to Argentina during the country’s Dirty War, when the Argentine military dictatorship tortured and killed tens of thousands of suspected dissindents. One day, a young Nazario came across a pool of blood on the sidewalk. She learned that two journalists were killed for writing about what was going on in their country.

February 8, 2017 - 8:33am
"Language is the only identity I have and even that is questionable," the Pulitzer Prize-winning author said Tuesday night.

For Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jhumpa Lahiri, being a writer is about insisting you have a voice – or even voices. She learned this when she began to read, write and translate Italian – even though she grew up with Bengali and English.

“Translation is always an act of interpretation.” said Lahiri, who currently teaches creative writing at Princeton University.

Lahiri discussed the relationship between language, identity and writing Tuesday night during a University Lecture in Hendricks Chapel.

March 30, 2016 - 11:12am
Mary Roach, journalist and author of several books, pursues all things considered weird, fascinating or taboo.

Mary Roach can easily be described as gutsy — fairly often, her work literally involves guts. 

March 9, 2016 - 11:19am
Dacher Keltner's work in studying compassion and human psychology led to his contribution in developing the emotional characters starring in the 2015 Disney Pixar film.

Upon learning that Dacher Keltner consulted Pixar for the 2015 film Inside Out on how to accurately portray emotions, people — including adults — ask him about their own feelings.

March 20, 2015 - 2:47pm
Laurel Richie tackled issues facing women and LGBT athletes in the sporting community at the second university lecture of the semester.

Laurel J. Richie, the president of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA), had an in-depth conversation with the audience at Hendricks Chapel on Wednesday evening. As the leader of the longest running women’s professional sport league in the country, Richie shared her insights about women's sports, as well as about the issues and opportunities of the WNBA.

March 26, 2014 - 8:38am
The third University Lectures speaker performed multiple acts Tuesday night, challenging listeners to think critically about social issues and about grace.

Hendricks Chapel was filled with laughter and applause from students and adults Tuesday night as actress, playwright and professor Anna Deavere Smith, one of the last guests of the University Lectures series this semester, performed.

Bringing a fresh perspective to the stage, Smith challenged the audience to think critically about the “world of transition” we are all living in. Focusing on themes of twilight, or in-between, moments and aspects of grace, Smith engaged the crowd with her physical presence and sense of humor.

March 6, 2012 - 10:25pm
Jonathan Franzen, a National Book Award-winning author, spoke at Hendricks Chapel on Tuesday night as the first speaker of the spring semester in the University Lecture series.

A bald, middle-aged man looked up from his newspaper with a start, his eyes magnified by lenses that look like portholes.

“Cornel West is also speaking tonight?” he said to the woman beside him. “Shoot, I like him.”

The woman folded her wrinkled hands on her copy of The Corrections. “I like Franzen,” she said.

November 15, 2011 - 10:57pm
Journalist Bob Herbert advocated for building up the country's infrastructure, both literal and figurative, in Tuesday's University Lecture.

Before former New York Times columnist Bob Herbert spoke Tuesday night, he paused for brief introspection before sternly addressing the crowd at Hendricks Chapel.

“It’s customary to start a talk like this with a couple of jokes, but there’s nothing funny about what’s going on in the United States,” Herbert said.