Campus News: Multimedia Belt

November 12, 2016 - 1:18pm
Renowned architect reflects on how design and development can bring people together.

This semester’s University Lectures series wrapped up with a presentation from internationally renowned architect James Corner. Corner, founder and director of Field Operations in New York City, discussed the importance of architecture and why it is environmentally, socially and economically relevant to urban development.

Corner began the lecture by walking the audience through traditional landscape and architecture styles, pointing out the basics like the scenic and visual aspects.

November 11, 2016 - 3:24pm
A candlelight vigil was held outside Hendricks Chapel on Wednesday, Nov. 9, in response to the results of the 2016 presidential election.

The day after a surprising and upsetting presidential election for many on campus,  several campus organizations began offering various forms of support and recovery.

On Wednesday evening, Syracuse Uniersity and SUNY-ESF students gathered in vigil outside Hendricks Chapel with candles to "stand against hate."

November 10, 2016 - 12:23pm
The Department of African American Studies spoke about how BLM has been reflected in art and literature at a lecture on Wednesday.

Syracuse University’s Department of African American Studies held a presentation on Wednesday about how the Black Lives Matter movement of today is reflected in different forms of art, history and literature of the past.

The presentation, called Black Lives Matter in Art, History and Literature, was held in 214 Slocum and consisted of three speeches, each delivered by a professor of both the African American Studies and English departments at SU.

October 29, 2016 - 11:52am
A week of events that began on Monday paid tribute to the 35 Syracuse University students killed on Pan Am Flight 103 in 1988.

Over two decades ago, an unthinkable tragedy struck the Syracuse University community: Pan Am flight 103, a flight carrying 35 SU students returning home for the holidays after a semester in London, never reached its destination. It crashed over a residential area of Scotland after a bomb exploded on-board on Dec. 21, 1988. Each year, SU hosts a Remembrance Week to honor the 270 lives that were lost.

October 25, 2016 - 11:02am
A Washington Post reporter who served 18 months in an Iranian prison was given the distinct honor on Monday.

Jason Rezaian, a Washington Post reporter who was imprisoned in Iran for more than 18 months while on assignment, talked about his imprisonment, the mental changes he went through after being released and the duty of journalists on Monday at the Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium. He was honored with the Tully Free Speech Award by the Tully Center for Free Speech that afternoon.

October 20, 2016 - 2:03pm
Before her University Lectures talk, Lynsey Addario talked with The NewsHouse about working in some of the world's most dangerous places.

One of the most admired wartime photographers in modern history shared her experiences from the frontline while visiting SU's campus Tuesday to speak as part of the University Lectures series.

September 27, 2016 - 10:40am
Kenneth Kavajecz will appear in court this week for patronizing a prostitute, prompting student debate.

Students of SU’s Whitman School of Business are divided on the issue of their dean’s dismissal.

September 24, 2016 - 6:18pm
Tom Gjelten spoke about the rise of Donald Trump and the media's dilemma in covering him at a lecture on Friday.

Award-winning NPR correspondent Tom Gjelten spoke about the presidential election, his experiences reporting on religion, and his latest book “A Nation of Nations: A Great American Immigration Story” on Friday in the Hergenhan Auditorium.

September 7, 2016 - 9:06am
Starting this year, SU launches a major and minor program that combines data science and sports management

Students in the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics were offered an opportunity that’s never been available before on a university campus.

In May, SU announced that beginning in the fall semester of 2016, the school will add the first sports analytics major in the country to its curriculum.

September 1, 2016 - 11:40pm
Journalist Marc Lamont Hill and a panel of speakers discussed racism in response to recent police brutality, offering advice on ending discrimination toward African-Americans and all minorities.

After reporting on the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, Marc Lamont Hill was left with a graphic image of teenager Michael Brown’s dead body.

On Aug. 9, 2014, police and authorities abandoned Brown for four and a half fours, Hill said neighbors told him. It was 95 degrees outside, Hill added, and children attempted to protect Brown’s body with a sheet, but it was too short to cover both his feet and head.